Larva Click for more information about adult viburnum leaf beetles
Click for more information about viburnum leaf beetle larvae Click for more information about viburnum leaf beetle eggs.

Viburnum Leaf Beetle
Citizen Science


VLB in NYC? - Reports are coming in from the metro area and northern N.J. If you spot viburnum leaf beetles in that area, let us know through comments to this post.
More Gardening Resources from Cornell

Video:

Adult laying eggs, video by Jame Reilly
Adult laying eggs
[Video by Jame Reilly]

Larva hatching from egg, video by D. Swaciak
Larva emerging
[Video by D. Swaciak]

Larva feeding, video by Kent Loeffler
Larva feeding
[Video by Kent Loeffler.]

Adult VLB chewing foliage, D. Swaciak
Adult feeding

[Video by D. Swaciak]

Logo images by Kent Loeffler, Paul Weston & Craig Cramer

Time to look for egg-laying sites
Reduce infesta-
tions next season by pruning out egg-laying sites before hatching begins next spring.

Egg-laying sites.
Larger image.
More egg images.
egg-laying sites

The Viburnum Leaf Beetle Citizen Science Project teams gardeners, landscapers, 4-H groups, school classes and others with researchers at Cornell to learn more about the spread of this new pest in North America, and its effect on our landscapes. You -- as a Citizen Scientist -- can gather information that researchers can use to help stop the spread of this pest, reduce the damage it causes, and help us all be better prepared for future invasions by exotic pests.

Viburnum leaf beetles have been found in the shaded counties.  Click for larger map. Viburnum leaf beetles have been found in the shaded counties.
See also state & national distribution maps
The viburnum leaf beetle, Pyrrhalta viburni (Paykull), is an invasive, non-native beetle that first appeared in New York along Lake Ontario in 1996, and has steadily spread. It is a voracious eater that can defoliate viburnum shrubs entirely. Plants may die after two or three years of heavy infestation.

Participants in the project monitor their gardens, parks, or school yards throughout the spring and summer, looking for viburnum leaf beetles (VLBs). (They can also look for VLB eggs in winter.) If they find the beetle in any stage of its lifecycle, they report via an online form when and where they found the insect.

With your help we can learn more about the viburnum leaf beetle by:
  • Tracking its expanding range.
  • Learning which viburnum species it likes or dislikes.
  • Assessing how much damage VLBs cause.
  • Determining how weather and other factors affect its lifecycle.
  • Identify which management tactics effectively limit pest populations.
The Viburnum Leaf Beetle Project is a team effort led by Lori Bushway in Cornell University's Department of Horticulture and Dr. Paul Weston in the Department of Entomology.



Copyright, Department of Horticulture, Cornell University.

Project coordinator: Lori Bushway, ljb7@cornell.edu
Website design: Craig Cramer cdc25@cornell.edu

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