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Viburnum Leaf Beetle Citizen Science
Susceptibility to infestation

Which species of viburnum are most susceptible or relatively resistant to viburnum leaf beetles.
Viburnum leaf
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Logo images by Kent Loeffler, Paul Weston & Craig Cramer

This is a preliminary list compiled by Dr. Paul Weston, Woody Plant Entomologist, Cornell University. It reflects our experiences so far. Just because a species is listed as most resistant doesn't mean that it won't be infested.

Highly susceptible species are the first to be attacked, and are generally destroyed in the first 2-3 years following infestation.

Susceptible species are eventually destroyed, but usually are not heavily fed upon until the most susceptible species are eliminated.

Moderately susceptible species show varying degrees of susceptibility, but usually are not destroyed by the beetle.

Resistant species show little or no feeding damage, and survive infestations rather well. Most species in all susceptibility groups exhibit more feeding damage when grown in the shade.


Highly susceptible:
  • V. dentatum complex, arrowwood viburnums
  • V. nudum, possum-haw, smooth witherod viburnum
  • V. opulus, European cranberrybush viburnum
  • V. opulus var. americana (formerly V. trilobum), American cranberrybush viburnum
  • V. propinquum*, Chinese viburnum, Taiwanese viburnum
  • V. rafinesquianum, Rafinesque viburnum
Susceptible: Moderately susceptible Viburnum most resistant to the viburnum leaf beetle: *Based on observations at the Van Dusen Botanical Garden, Vancouver, B.C. by Carolyn Jones


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