Department of Horticulture New York State Horticulture Study Guide for Youth 4-H Logo

Home

Flowers &
Indoor Plants


Fruits & Nuts

Ornamentals

Vegetables

Special Topics

Resources

Glossary


Cornell University


Hyacinth
Hyacinthus sp.
(hi-ya-sin-thus)

What about it?

The hyacinth is a small, flowering plant with slender leaves. The bell-shaped flowers have 6 petals and come in white, yellow, pink, blue, or purple. They will usually grow to a height of 1 foot, half of that being flowerheads. They have a luxurious fragrance and are considered to be garden favorites.

What is it used for?

Hyacinths are grown in gardens but can be grown indoors, especially for forcing into winter bloom.

Where does it grow? How do we grow it?

Wherever they grow, hyacinths need full sun and rich, well-drained soil. If you want to maintain the high quality blooms of fresh bulbs, dig up the bulbs after the leaves have died down and store in a dry spot.

What are its primary problems?

Yellows can be a problem with imported bulbs. Mosiac, bacterial soft rot, and blue mold are potential problems.

How do we propagate it?

Hyacinths are grown from bulbs. Plant them in soil around September or October, 6 inches deep and 6 inches apart.

Previous Next
vinelogo

Copyright, Department of Horticulture, Cornell University.